Rasa Investments Group

Senaapathy Kangayam Cattle Research Foundation (SKCRF) is an in situ conservation and breeding centre based in Kuttapalayam in Tirupur district of Tamil Nadu. SKCRF functions as a resource and research centre working on conservation of native breeds of cattle. Awareness is focussed more intensely for the Kangayam breed and the Korangadu, a unique silvi pastoral land and farming system which is unique to Kongu region, mid-western Tamilnadu

Kangayam breed and the Korangadu are interdependent and hence they need to be protected from the serious threats that they face. SKCRF also works to preserve the bio-cultural values and the uniqueness around our indigenous breeds of livestock and the traditional knowledge associated with it.

It was around 2001, a monograph was published by Dr.Kandasamy and Dr. Pannerselvam of the Tamilnadu Veterinary and Animal Sciences University in which they provided data about the alarming loss of Kangayam cattle from 1990 to 2001 in this region. The loss of Kangayam cattle directly threatens the native cattle of Tamilndu as all breeds like Umblachery, Bargur, Puliakulam, Alambadi and Malai Madu owe their genetic existence to Kangayam. As soon as these connections were made, the idea of institutionalising the farm was envisaged by Thiru Sivasenapathy and his son Thiru Karthikeya Sivasenapathy. At this juncture the Senaapathy Kangayam Cattle Research Foundation was born with modern ideas to conserve the cattle and the associated habitat for posterity. SKCRF was started with a major donation of the nucleus herd from the family’s livestock farm earlier maintained by K. N. Swaminathan.

SKCRF is now involved in several activities that will promote the Kangayam breed in its habitat namely the Korangaduin Kongu region.

Senaapathy Kangayam Cattle Research Foundation (SKCRF) has been advocating and practicing ethical organic farming. The cattle in the farm grow in stress free environment in the open grass lands called Korangadu. This is called ecological livestock keeping. The Korangadu is a unique habitat comprising of Velan trees spread in regular intervals and with nearly 23 types of vegetation. With no pesticides in the grazing land, the cattle are raised harmoniously in their ecosystem grazing all day. As the cattle grazes on abundant kolukuttai grass and velan pods in the open natural environment thereby reducing external inputs making it a sound sustainable method of livestock keeping.

The major advantage is that the cattle rarely falls sick as it gets the best nutrition and immunity. So the occasion of cows being given any medicine or unwanted antibiotics which are harmful to them and us does not arise. The calcium rich soil in the region adds to the vigour of the cattle and the milk that it provides. Hence it is a much sought after milk for young ones and women for nutrition, immunity and calcium requirements.

This milk is recommended by ayurvedic practitioners in their treatment. The milk of Kangayam is recognized as healthy and nutritious milk which has no bad fat and is prescribed by doctors for children up to the age of 7. The ghee of this region is world famous due to ecological livestock keeping and calcium found in soil.To ensure all these things, SKCRF has been actively practicing advocating the best practices in these areas.

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Bull Stop

Managing Trustee : Karthikeya Sivasenapathy – linkedin 

When he was five, Karthikeya Sivasenapathy played in the cowshed of the family-owned farm in Kuttapalayam, near Kangayam. He loved the mooing of the cows, the fragrance of dry hay and the feel of silken skin as he petted the numerous young calves. He would accompany his grandfather and watch the farm hands wash the magnificent Kangayam bulls and paint their horns vermillion with kaavi.

At 41, his fascination has not lessened. He’s the eighth generation breeder of Kangayam cattle in his family and he runs the Senaapathy Kangayam Cattle Research Foundation. His work to popularise native breeds has been immense. Recognising his efforts, during a recent meeting in Kenya, he was nominated to the newly-constituted World Pastoral Parliament (WPP).

 

Secretary : Himakiran Anugulalinkedin

Hima is from an agrarian landlord clan based outside Chennai , with a 125 year engagement with Madras and it’s old trader setup that funded the expansion of the British empire. His ancestors cultivated Indigo, processed it into dyes and sold it to traders in Town aka Georgetown , who then exported it all over . That funded the clan transition from just being agrarian peasants to becoming landlords, by buying a Zamindari estate from Brahmins who moved out to chase ICS dreams , by way of education.

When Hima came back from the US, he got involved with textiles. As he says it must have been some adamant gene in him passed down from his forefathers.

As he says it must have been some adamant gene in him passed down from his forefathers.

Now his dream is to cultivate Indigo, process it and use that dye to make denims from Madras , and try them with Organic Cotton too!

Hima first saw Jallikattu in 2013 although he has been a visitor to Madurai since 1996 and also ran a small IT venture there from 2004-2010. Destiny works in weird ways and so he was back in Madurai.

He says “When you are rooted, you see something and your gut says this is right and needs to be protected. That’s how it was with Jallikattu. I didn’t see it in one dimension….is anything in India like that ? I saw culture, economics, tradition, pride, bravery, scientific breed saving and the sheer joy of living life….no wonder it is probably the only activity that humans have continuously documented over the past 5000 years

Hima wrote a long essay detailing out the Jallikattu campaign very effectively and powerfully.

There were scores of cattle breeds in India 100 years ago – some say as many as 130 – and now there are only 37. Unless we engage with the traditional livestock keepers and support them, we will lose these breeds as well as lay the ground for commercial cattle based dairies and slaughter houses to dominate the country.

Tamil Nadu had six cattle breeds. These are Kangayam, Pulikulam, Umbalachery, Barugur, Alambadi and Malai Maadu. There are a few more minor breeds without proper documentation or care. Most of these are on the verge of extinction. Each breed has evolved in perfect harmony with its local region. Kangayams fed on grasses in the calcium rich soil are the sturdiest animals and can pull up to 2.5 times their body weight with ease. Umbalacherys have shorter legs which make it easy for them to walk around in the water filled fields of the delta region. Barugurs in the hills of Erode district and Malai Maadus in Theni district are grazed in reserve forests and are adept at walking around in hilly terrain. The Pulikulam, found mostly in the region around Madurai, Sivaganga, Ramnad, Pudukottai and parts of Tiruchi district are herded in several hundreds and walk all day grazing before being penned for the night.

Native cattle have evolved over millennia, adapting to the local environmental conditions. They are an integral part of farming, especially for small and marginal farmers as they serve multiple purposes like ploughing, transportation, source for farmyard manure, organic treatments like panchagavya, jeevamritham, and as a source of A2 milk. The native cattle are both an input as well as insurance to the livestock keepers. In ancient Tamil and Sanskrit literature, cattle is considered as wealth. Cattle were measured as a unit of wealth. In the Tirukkural, education is considered to be wealth and the word used for wealth is madu, meaning cattle. So it has a socio-cultural connotation which denotes lives and livestock having co-existed and cultures having coined usages around them.

Banning Jallikattu Will Undermine Tamil Nadu’s Indigenous Cattle Breeds : The Wire

Bull Stop : The Hindu

The foundation also has a resource and research centre for conservation of Kangayam cattle and Korangadu, a Silvi pasture grazing system in the western districts of the State.

An awareness for the protection of indigenous breeds of cattle has been created because of the jallikattu protest last year by the people and students of Tamil Nadu. I would like to thank them all on behalf of the cattle grazers,” says Karthikeya Sivasenapathy, managing trustee of the foundation

Website on Kangayam Cattle : The Hindu Coimbatore

 

From Sunny Narang ’s Facebook Posts :


8th January, 2018

Kangayambull

Then in a very serendipitous meeting in Aparna Krishnan’s home, we met Komakkambedu Himakiran, a highly dynamic US-returned Industrial Engineer, whose main passion was organic farming, indigenous livestock and absolute localisation of governance via Panchayati Raj.

#KangayamBull #SKCRF #TierNIndia #SustainableIndia

I worked for about two decades, 90’s and 2000’s with hundreds of artisan entrepreneurs in rural and kasba India, supporting them to reinvent their skills to contemporary markets , being associated and building networks with Dastkar, People Tree, Either Or, iTokri.com.

My urban start-up curating funding as well as mentoring also began with Happily Unmarried around that time, and by now I have a direct connect with dozens of start-ups, ranging from disruptive cotton-spinning technology like Microspin Machine Works, to food nerds run Feazt , sports from Olympics Anglian Medal-Hunt Company, LEH LEH Sports, Awadh Mutineers, fintech like Bharosa Advisor , textile designers like Cotton Rack Khadi Clothing to sustainability think-tanks like Indian School of Innovation in Sustainability, young experimental makers Anshul Anand and musicians like Harpreet Singh.

And many many others.

Then I was involved with North-East especially via Shillong Lajong Football Club (SLFC) to build a deeper foundation of the football talent in the 2010’s.

That led to the founding of the only non-mainland ISL – Indian Super League Football Club NorthEast United FCand increased financial support by local elites to their own players and now two more clubs are in the I-League, NEROCA FC from Manipur and Aizawl FC from Mizoram.

Then in a very serendipitous meeting in Aparna Krishnan’s home, we met Komakkambedu Himakiran, a highly dynamic US-returned Industrial Engineer, whose main passion was organic farming, indigenous livestock and absolute localisation of governance via Panchayati Raj.

This was end 2015. From then on began my deep learning of Tamil culture, society, history, politics.

I always say that you can only go as deep within another, as deep you have gone within yourself. So if you have not dived deep within your own culture, you cannot have an ability to understand any other culture.

From Hima, I understood the deep connect of Jallikattu to the agri-livestock-sustainability rural cultures of Tamil lands.

The total arrogance of the elites in a few metro cities of India, about the reality of most of India, is what will create the future fault-lines.

I am delighted to be a Dillivasi among the patrons of the Senaapathy Kangayam Cattle Research Foundation, who mostly are from the Coimbatore region .

They have come up with the best website I have seen in India for cattle conservation and will be coming up with many new ideas of connecting urban and rural societies via the indigenous bridge of Kangayam Bulls and cattle.

This is what I call Tier N, India. Not Metros, Tier-1 or Tier 2 towns, but every habitat , village or small town is a center of sustainability, with its own creativity and celebrations.

And we need to use every tool and technology available to nurture that vision, of a deeply rooted society, with imaginations and confidence to take on the world.

Great work Karthikeya Sivasenapathy and Hima.

Thanks Aparna Krishnan for the true satsang of indigenous solutions.

Senaapathy Kangayam Cattle Research Foundation

Senaapathy Kangayam Cattle Research Foundation (SKCRF) is an in situ conservation and breeding centre based in Kuttapalayam in Tirupur district of Tamil Nadu.

SKCRF functions as a resource and research centre working on conservation of native breeds of cattle. Awareness is focussed more intensely for the Kangayam breed and the Korangadu, a unique silvi pastoral land and farming system which is unique to Kongu region, mid-western Tamilnadu.

Kangayam breed and the Korangadu are interdependent and hence they need to be protected from the serious threats that they face.

SKCRF also works to preserve the bio-cultural values and the uniqueness around our indigenous breeds of livestock and the traditional knowledge associated with it.”

Skcrf Skcrf Skcrf


21st December, 2017

#SponsorAKangayam #GetGheeFor20Years #SKCRF#IndigenousCattle #Conservation

Senaapathy Kangayam Cattle Research Foundation or SKCRF led by Karthikeya Sivasenapathy who is the Managing Trustee , has been at the forefront in Tamil Nadu for conserving the traditional breed of Kangayam cattle .

India is a repository for domesticated animal biodiversity having 30 well-defined cattle breeds which is 7.5 per cent of the total animal breeds globally.

Karthikeya was one of the main campaigners for saving Jallikattu earlier this year when lacs of young people gathered to protest in Chennai’s Marina beach and also across the state.

A common friend Komakkambedu Himakiran has been a co-partner of Karthikeya and got us involved in the movement a couple of years ago.

Karthikeya Sivasenapathy, managing trustee of the Senaapathy Kangayam Cattle Research Foundation (SKCRF), told IANS that “the fight is not just for Jallikattu but the preservation of several native cattle breeds of many Indian states like Gujarat, Maharashtra, Madhya Pradesh, Andhra Pradesh, as well as sports like the Rural Olympics in Punjab.”

Himakiran Anugula , Secretary, SKCRF and an organic farmer in Tiruvallur district, said: “We do not need globalisation that ruins Indian villages and its environment. We carried out our campaign in favour of Jallikattu since 2013 and took it to the social media and to educational institutions.

The SKCRF is now sustaining the movement of indigenous cattle conservation by arranging sponsorships for the traditional Kangayam cattle.

We have sponsored One Kangayam Cow for Life.

I asked them a few questions about Kangayam cattle :

  • What is the daily cost of fodder, labour etc on one cow/bull ?
    In a year with good rains, Rs. 125-15 per day for a cow and Rs. 225-250 for a bull.
    In a drought year, Rs. 200-225 for a cow and Rs. 300-350 for a bull.
  • What will the supporter get – Ghee etc through the year , once , twice ?
    We will host them at our foundation’s farm once a year. Ghee will be sent twice a year.
    Name board will be displayed at the cow shed. We will mention the names in the annual report as well as website.
  • What is the lifetime of a Cow/Bull ?
    Cow: 18-22 years
    Bull: 22-25 years

The Kangayam cattle, a medium sized draught breed usually of white or grey colour, once was – and continues to be to an extent – the backbone of the local agro-ecology. Every farming family owned a pair of them for ploughing, pulling water, hauling the harvest, and powering carts for personal transportation.

This cattle was raised on privately owned pastureland, the Korangadu, a very bio-diverse and extremely drought resistant sylvo-pastoral system containing 29 types of shrubs and trees . The Kangayam cattle was also essential for rituals and in religious life. Each village had a temple bull that provided free stud services. During Pongal, a Tamil harvest festival, the cattle was elaborately decorated and, on other occasions, bullock cart races known as Rekhla provided entertainment to and prestige to the owners of the winning bullock pairs.

But, like many local livestock breeds, the Kangayam cattle is now under threat, due to a number of factors such as a change in the farming system, availability of motorized transport, and the loss of Korangadu pastureland, mostly due to its high real estate value. Today some 10 lac acres of Korangadu land exist in the region against the 22 lac acres in 1990.

The SKCRF is at the forefront of conserving the breed, keeping a herd of about 40 animals, educating farmers about the use of organic manure, organising competitions and fairs, and raising awareness of students and the general public about the Kangayam cattle. Sadly there is practically no government support for these efforts, even though India is a signatory to the Interlaken Declaration and the Global Plan of Action on Animal Genetic Resources.

While the country can boast a well-staffed and well-funded National Bureau of Animal Genetic Resources, this institute is oriented at research rather than practical conservation. And although there are various government conservation programmes with huge budgets they do not benefit the people at the grassroots who actively conserve by looking after livestock even if it is unprofitable.

Furthermore, there seems to be no awareness among decision makers that indigenous breeds cannot be dissociated from their respective agro-ecosystems, in this case the Korangadu pastureland, and neither can be conserved without the other.

Love of Bulls in Tamil Nadu : Koehler
A movement to save Kangayam Cattle gaining momentum : The Hindu Sci-Tech
SKCRF brings out book on cattle breed : The Hindu Paper
Jalikattu : Strikes, blockades, procession as Modi dashes ordinance hopes : Business Standard


30th January, 2017

Sunny with siva Rural Cultures Of India

#TamilBulls #InLutyensDelhi #Jallikattu #LivestockBiodiversity #SustainableFarming #RuralCulturesOfIndia

Today had a great conversation with Karthikeya Sivasenapathy and Komakkambedu Himakiran Anugula, Trustees of Senaapathy Kangayam Cattle Research Foundation and Biodiversity Conservation Council of India – BICCI , both based in Tamil Nadu and part of the Core Group of the campaign for the research and campaigning behind the support of #Jallikattu.

They have been at it for years.

Senaapathy Kangayam Cattle Research Foundation does In situ conservation of livestock -Kangayam cattle, Kangayam breeding centre. Training centre on use of cow dung and urine for zero budget farming.

Biodiversity Conservation Council of India (BiCCI) is a non-profit Public Charitable Trust formed with the intention of conservation of Bio-diversity in India. One of its primary objectives is to document all traditional farming, pastoralist systems and livestock practices and create bio-cultural protocols for communities and ecosystems on the lines of established practices.

There is no questioning the reality, that Civilization, Society, Religion, Culture and Language precedes the social-contract we call a Constitution. A Constitution is made by the people, and is always a work in progress, changing, making amendments according to the collective ethics and needs of a society.

Jallikattu has been a great tool for people like me to understand deeply Tamil Society and Culture, and the least all non-Tamils can do is read and understand those close to the herds and farms of Tamil Nadu , not some sterile activists sitting on their lazy bums in TV studios and claustrophobic offices in Delhi, Mumbai or Bengaluru.

That tens of thousands of people across religions, classes, occupations in many towns of Tamil Nadu gathered to protest about Jallikattu is for me an amazing message of Bio-Cultural mobilization that is almost autonomous led by hundreds of informed Tamils about their traditions .

Listening to Krishnamachari Srikkanth talking and singing in Tamil on an English New Channel was an absolute delight .

And if you have not seen the hyper-viral Jallikattu music video Takkaru Takkaru, then you are missing something. No one in India or anywhere used a music video as a documentary and a fiction story telling like the Tamils have !

In 2015 end we met with some amazing Tamilians in Chennai.

Among them was Komakkambedu Himakiran Anugula

Himakiran Anugula is an Industrial Engineer who worked in USA , from a family of farmers and textile manufacturers and an Organic Farming , Indigenous Cattle, Local Language activist .

He was for me a young man , who understood the Global scenario and was as much at home on a farm or a factory .

His Tamil Identity was part of the Union of India , but never India as a Mono-Cultural-Lingual Superstate led by the inane Lutyens Delhi Elites . He was introduced to us by Aparna Krishnan , an ex-software engineer who works with a Dalit community in rural Andhra Pradesh

Paalaguttapalle Blog

Hima as we call him had written in 2016 a brilliant riposte on the Tamil cultures of Indigenous Cattle, to all the Urban Animal Liberation activists who scream “Did You Ask The Bull” (They would like the whole agri-livestock economy of India destroyed as they use Bullock-Carts, Donkeys, Sheep for wool, lets forget all meat and dairy).

Banning Jaikattu will undermine Tamil Nadu’s indigenous cattle breeds : The Wire

The Jallikattu protests show that against the cosmo-liberal stereotype of ‘Indian young people’, there are young people, millions of them, to whom roots, identity and culture matters and they do not aspire to lose their Tamil-ness to make the cut in the Delhi-Mumbai idea of Indianness.

Before the support movement for #Jallikattu began, I had a call with Himakiran and Karthikeya Sivasenapathy who is the Managing Trustee of Senaapathy Kangayam Cattle Research Foundation , which is working towards conservation of the famous Kangayam cattle from that region.

I told them that its ONLY the Tamil Bull that can shatter the absolute arrogant ignorance of the urban elites in Delhi-Mumbai-Bengaluru who thrive on an industrial modernity and have no or very little idea or experience of rural or regional cultures of agricultural-livestock-artisan lifestyles , occupations and vocations .

I am loving the fact that the folk cultures of India are standing up to the monocultures of sterile urbanist modernity, in all their multifaceted diversity.

Route Map

Senaapathy Kangayam Cattle Research Foundation is situated in Kuttapalayam village, Palayakottai in the Kangayam taluka of Tirupur District(formerly Erode District), Tamilnadu, India. The area is best suited to cattle breeding. The soil is red-loam of calcium rich gravel known as ‘odai jelly’, and is the best land for rearing cattle. Such soils are known to be cool and though shallow, are retentive of moisture sufficient for raising pasture.

It is, however, a dry tract where the cultivator has to depend upon the monsoon. In some parts wells are used for irrigating farm lands; and to raise water from a depth of 30 – 60 ft. the farmers require strong and efficient bullocks. More-over, on the break of the monsoon, large areas of land have to be prepared and sown before the soil dries up and for this quick work efficient bullocks are very necessary.

The founder of the farm is Kuttappalayam K.N.Saminathan who served as the Chairman of ‘The live stock development committee of the government of Tamil Nadu’ for a decade. He was the member of the lower house in the government of Tamil Nadu for the period 1967 – 1972 .

He brought in various legislations for protecting the indigenous #Kangayam race from extinction. Due to the love and interest he had for the kangayam cows the honorable chief minister Dr.Arignar C.N.Annadurai appointed K.N.Saminathan as the chairman of the Tamil Nadu live stock development committee.

Kangayam

Senaapathy Kangayam Cattle Research Foundation is headed by its Chairman the founder’s son, Mr.K.Saminathan Sivasenapathy and managed by its Managing Trustee Mr.Karthikeya Sivasenapathy.

Senaapathy Kangayam Cattle Research Foundation (SKCRF) has been advocating and practicing ethical organic farming even before it was institutionalized. The cattle in the farm grow in this kind of stress free environment freely and healthily.

This is called ecological livestock keeping.

The cattle are not stall fed.

They are allowed to graze in the open grass lands called Korangadu, a unique silvi pasture grazing system.

The Korangadu is a unique habitat comprising of Velan trees spread in regular intervals and with nearly 23 types of vegetation. With no pesticides and all indigenous natural vegetation, the cattle are raised harmoniously in their ecosystem grazing all day.

Grazing

As the cattle grazes on abundant kolukuttai grass and velan pods in the open natural environment thereby reducing external inputs making it a sound sustainable method of livestock keeping. The additional advantage is the cattle rarely falls sick as it gets the best nutrition and immunity.

So the occasion of cows being given any medicine or unwanted antibiotics which are harmful to them and us does not arise. The calcium rich soil in the region adds to the vigour of the cattle and the milk that it provides. Hence it is a much sought after milk for young ones and women for nutrition, immunity and calcium requirements. This is the milk recommended for ayurvedic treatments .The milk of Kangayam is recognized as A2 type of milk which has no bad fat and is prescribed by doctors for children up to the age of 7. The ghee of this region is world famous due to ecological livestock keeping and calcium found in soil.

All over Tamil Nadu, tens of thousands of people, largely not under any political banner, have been protesting against the ban on jallikattu since Tuesday. The most widely broadcast protest was from the Marina beach in Chennai. But the Marina beach protest is actually very small compared to the ones taking place in other parts of Tamil Nadu including Madurai, Erode, Salem and Coimbatore.

It’s not only big cities but small towns and villages as well which have joined the protest against the ban, thus uniting the length and breadth of Tamil Nadu. “We want Jallikattu” is a cultural as well as a political demand.

People had assembled in protest from Tuesday night, but the “national media” didn’t live-broadcast it. Perhaps because this was not Delhi and hence didn’t matter to the “nation”.

As the day progressed on 18 January, young people from all walks of life spilt onto the streets, from students to IT professionals to farmers, including many, many women. As we speak, this has become too big for the ‘national media’ to ignore, and since this is not Kashmir from where independent media and telecom connectivity can be blacked out at will, ‘national media’ wants to explain to the ‘rest of India’, why are Tamils angry and why are they are protesting?

Even today, with the jallikattu protests, the Tamils have opened the space for the rest of us to assert our cultural rights against the whims and fancies of the agencies of the Union government that imagine the Indian Union as a bloated form of the NCR. The way the Union government has been criticised by the Tamil protesters on the ground show that they understand this political dynamic very well.

The huge presence of women for a “male sport” shows that this issue goes beyond the particulars of jallikattu and stems from something bigger and wider. Even non-resident Tamils from around the world (in USA, Ireland, Mexico, Thailand, South Korea, Ukraine, Russia, Malaysia and elsewhere) have joined in the protest on the Tamil social media space where unlike in Noida, Whatsapp messages about bovine animals are being used to unite people and not divide them.

The Jallikattu protests show that against the cosmo-liberal stereotype of ‘Indian young people’, there are young people, millions of them, to whom roots, identity and culture matters and they do not aspire to lose their Tamil-ness to make the cut in the Delhi-Mumbai idea of Indianness.

These are people who know English very well but have chosen to respond in Tamil to Delhi media’s questions posed to them in English. If this appears odd, remember the number of times Delhi-based English media carries responses in Hindi without any translation. Try to think why that is not considered odd when a majority of the citizens of the Indian Union do not understand Hindi.

In the protests, a recurring theme is that the Tamil interests have been marginalised in the Indian Union. The Tamil culture is older than the Indian Union, and its self-respect and institutions are very important parts of that culture. The fact that Tamil Nadu now doesn’t have control over its own maritime trade, foreign relations or for that matter most aspects of Tamil internal affairs, is hardly two centuries old. The Tamil political memory and historical consciousness goes far beyond that and is a living thing that influences politics of here and now.

During the Eelam Tamil genocide, the Union government explicitly sided with the Sri Lankan government, thus making clear that Tamil Nadu’s sentiments matter little to Delhi even when it comes to the genocide of Tamils elsewhere. Thus it is only natural to think that many Tamils feel that they are getting cheated in this deal called the Indian Union.

At this juncture, it doesn’t help when the so-called “national opinion” brands make fun of Tamils as irrational or barbarous people who love to be cruel to their animals. If at all, it is quite duplicitous since Delhi doesn’t mind the revenue that is extracted from Tamil Nadu while using its institutions like the Animal Welfare Board of India to undercut Tamil cultural practices.

That is the tragedy of a centralised administration where bureaucrats from high female foeticide states get to decide the women’s rights policies of socially progressive states like Tamil Nadu.

Whether Jallikattu is right or wrong, should it be discontinued or not, or continued with modifications, is an out and out Tamil affair. That the Animal Welfare Board of India, which doesn’t exactly reflect Tamil opinion, gets to decide on this shows how Tamils are infantilised as being incapable of deciding their own affairs, including their own cultural practices, or for that matter, animal welfare issues.

This stems from the two long lists called the Union and Concurrent lists of the Constitution of India that gives almost unfettered right to the agencies of the Union government over the lives and issues of people of various states.

It is this false federalism, in which state rights have been completely disrespected, is the source of most of the problems, and the solutions to this are achievable within the ambit of the Constitution of Indian by large scale move of subjects from the Union and Concurrent lists to the State list in keeping with the federal democratic spirit of the Cabinet Mission plan of 1946, to which most elected lawmakers of the time agreed, only to turn their back on it after 1947.

Yes, reforms are needed and they can take many shapes. The ambit of the Supreme Court can be limited to Union and concurrent list subjects with state-based apex courts becoming the highest authority on state subjects.

This along with a move of most subjects to the State list can realise the full federal democratic potential of the Union of India. Otherwise, such deep-rooted political grievances promote alienation and make their presence felt in some way or the other, in not so palatable ways.

While deciding to hang Afzal Guru, in spite of many grounds for reasonable doubt about the case, the Supreme Court of India said, “The collective conscience of the society will be satisfied only if the death penalty is awarded to Afzal Guru.” If the ‘collective conscience’ of the society has already been admitted by the Supreme Court to be a decider in handing out judgements, what prevents it from listening to the ‘collective conscience’ of Tamils regarding jallikattu that is on display in the protests all over their land today?”

Narendra Modi govt’s stand on Jallikattu re-establishes bias towards Tamil interests : FirstPost